Learn About NCWIT Resources

NCWIT resources are well-researched, free, easy-to-use, and available online.
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Learn About NCWIT Resources

 
NCWIT has a collection of over 100 evidence-based resources focused on female participation in computing that provide information and tools for implementing change, raising awareness, and reaching out to critical populations. These resources are well-researched, free, easy-to-use, and available online at www.ncwit.org/resources.

How Are NCWIT Resources Created?

Members of NCWIT Alliances, NCWIT staff, and other computing community stakeholders contribute evaluated local practices, submit ideas/suggestions, and request new resources. Out of the many contributions, submissions, and requests, NCWIT social scientists prioritize resources for creation. NCWIT social scientists collaborate with contributors to develop content. This content is designed by NCWIT staff and published for the general public.

View the Resource Creation Infographic (PDF) for more details.

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Resources Made in Collaboration

Resource

Which Computing Majors Are Right for Me?

www.ncwit.org/whichcomputingmajor (PDF)
Co-branded with the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), this card explains how computing interests and talents line up with different undergraduate degrees and the careers that follow.

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Resource

Resources for Retaining and Advancing Mid-career Technical Women

www.ncwit.org/midcareerguide (PDF)
Produced in partnership with the Mid-career Project Team of NCWIT’s Workforce Alliance, this guide is intended to help those who work with or have influence over the careers of mid-career technical women and the environments where they work.

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Resource

REU-in-a-Box: Expanding the Pool of Computing Researchers

www.ncwit.org/reubox
Based on the work of an Academic Alliance project team, this Program-in-a-Box explains the benefits of undergraduate research in computing and guides faculty mentors through the three stages of an REU (research experience for undergraduates): Before the REU (Deciding to Get Involved and Getting Started), During the REU (Faculty Mentor Activities and Student Activities), and After the REU (Post-REU Assessment and Next Steps for Student Researchers).

The Computer Research Association’s Committee on the Status of Women in Computing Research (CRA-W) is continuing work on resources that complement REU-in-a-Box.

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Resource

Top 10 Ways

www.ncwit.org/top10ways
Feedback from a Microsoft Faculty Summit session and an NCWIT Pacesetters visit to UT-Austin led to succinct lists of top, evidence-based approaches for recruiting, retaining, and advancing females in computing. Top 10 Ways You Can Retain Students in Computing, the first of these lists published, was quickly followed by Top 10 Ways Managers Can Retain Technical Women in collaboration with the Mid-career Project Team of NCWIT’s Workforce Alliance.

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Resource

Offer Computing Workshops and Camps: They Benefit Both Students and the Teachers Who Offer Them

www.ncwit.org/summercamps
Produced in collaboration with Barbara Ericson of the K-12 Alliance, this card along with its accompanying webpage encourages teachers to offer workshops and camps. Pulling together many existing resources from the extended computing community, it offers ideas for partnering, curricula, and implementation.

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Resource

How Does the Physical Environment Affect Women’s Entry and Persistence in Computing? Design Physical Space that Has Broad Appeal

www.ncwit.org/physicalspaceuw (PDF)
This NCWIT Promising Practice offers research on stereotypes and the environment conducted by Sapna Cheryan, a member of NCWIT’s Social Science Advisory Board. The case study, contributed by Hank Levy of the Academic Alliance, highlights designing the Paul G. Allen Center for Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington to be welcoming and “non-techy” in appearance.

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Resource

Moving Beyond Computer Literacy: Why Schools Should Teach Computer Science

www.ncwit.org/schools
Co-branded with Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) and ACM, this resource provides information about the value of computer science curriculum for students, educators, local and national economies as well as global society. It offers steps schools can take to successfully incorporate computer science education.

Computing in the Core continues to do work in this area as a “non-partisan advocacy coalition” designed to raise the profile of computer science education and elevate it to a core academic subject in K-12 education.

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Check out other NCWIT resources for who you are and what you’d like to do at www.ncwit.org/resources.
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All resources are produced with the support of our Investment Partners, Strategic Partners, and Program Sponsors.

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