In the News: Reboot Representation Tech Coalition, NCWIT K-12 Resources Featured in Ad Council She Can STEM Campaign, and More

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This newsletter provides a monthly recap of the biggest headlines about women and computing, news about NCWIT, and links to resources to equip you as change leaders for increasing women’s participation in technology. Practices or content of the news presented are not vetted or endorsed by NCWIT.


 

In this issue you will find:

NCWIT in the News

New NCWIT Resources

News on the Radar

NCWIT Opportunities

 

NCWIT in the News

 

Reboot Representation Tech Coalition

In 2017, 26 percent of the computing workforce were women, and less than 10 percent were women of color (5 percent were Asian, 3 percent were African-American, and 1 percent were Hispanic). Announced on Wednesday, September 12, 2018, the Reboot Representation Tech Coalition aims to double the number of black, Latina, and Native American women receiving computing degrees by 2025.

“As technology’s role in society grows, so does the urgency of diversifying the tech sector,” says Melinda Gates, Co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and a passionate supporter for women in tech.

The Reboot Representation Tech Coalition is housed at NCWIT and founded with the support of Pivotal Ventures, an investment and incubation company founded by Melinda Gates. All funds from the tech companies will go directly to efforts that engage underrepresented women of color.

Read the full announcement from Melinda Gates online.

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“SheCanSTEM”On Monday, September 10, 2018, the Ad Council announced NCWIT amongst its coalition of partners convened for She Can STEM — a national public service campaign that includes digital and social creative content, as well as television, print, and out-of-home advertising to showcase the achievements of female STEM role models, reinforcing the idea that STEM is cool, unexpected, and inspiring.

The She Can STEM website (https://shecanstem.com/resources/) includes NCWIT resources most relevant to the campaign’s target K-12 audience:

  • NCWIT AspireIT // NCWIT AspireIT offers a variety of tech workshops and camps nationwide to K-12 girls, which are all instructed by high school and college women in order to create a fun, near-peer environment. // https://aspireit.aspirations.org/programs/upcoming

  • TECHNOLOchicas // Access more than a dozen videos, featuring relatable Latinas in tech who can inspire young Latinas to discover (or foster) their computing-related passions by offering a candid look into their vibrant lives and their paths towards success. // www.technolochicas.org/camp   

  • Counselors for Computing (C4C) Careers with Code Poster Series // With these posters, students can envision how they can use computing skills to make a difference in the world. // www.ncwit.org/C4Cposters

  • Which Computing Pathway Is Right for Me? // Students can discover how computing interests and talents line up with different undergraduate courses of study and the careers that follow. // www.ncwit.org/pace

Read the full Ad Council press release and addendum, and check out the New York Times announcement.

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The Hidden Figures Congressional Gold Medal Act

On Thursday, August 2, 2018, NCWIT endorsed the bipartisan bill to award Congressional Gold Medals to ‘Hidden Figures’ Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, and Dr. Christine Darden for their work at NASA.

The Congressional Gold Medal is the highest civilian award in the U.S. It is awarded to those who have performed an achievement that has had an impact on American history and culture that is likely to be recognized in the recipient’s field for years to come.

Read the full NCWIT announcement online.

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New NCWIT Resources

  • Computer Science Is for Everyone: A toolkit for middle and high schools to increase diversity in computer science education // www.ncwit.org/CSEveryone_Toolkit
    Schools across the country and around the world are working to increase access to quality CS education. But while CS classes and opportunities are expanding, too many students — especially girls, Black, Latino and Native American youth — feel like it’s not for them. As a result, the whole world misses out on the diverse perspectives needed to fuel innovation and drive change. The insights and tools in this kit will help ensure all young people understand the value of a CS education and feel welcomed and empowered to succeed.

  • “children”Enrich PK-8 Computing Education and Prepare ALL Students for the Future // www.ncwit.org/enriched
    How can educators help to expand opportunities for computing education? This resource will walk educators through ways to engage and encourage diverse participation, partner with established programs, and use or adapt established curriculum.

  • [Updated] Pathways to IT and Computing Careers // www.ncwit.org/C4C
    Part of NCWIT Counselors for Computing (C4C), this three-card series connect students’ interests with IT and computing career paths that can be achieved through enrollment in a community college, a university, or a four-year college; or military service and beyond. Degrees and military assignments are linked to job titles, projected growth, and wages.

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News on the Radar

 

Departments are Boosting Women Student Retention

Did you know that NCWIT Extension Services Transformation (NEXT) Award recipients utilize NCWIT Extension Services (ES) research-based approaches and resources for recruiting and retaining women that focus on creating culture change within educational systems, not on changing women to fit these systems?

In part one of a three-part series published on EdScoop, several NEXT Award recipients share their positive outcomes, resulting from core curriculum changes that focus on collaborative learning, a “flipped classroom” model, and more.

“Students are able to learn more quickly than through traditional methods and experience reduced frustration,” says Alison Norman, an associate professor of computer science at University of Texas at Austin.

Read the full EdScoop publication to find out what other NEXT Award recipients like UT Austin are doing, including Michigan State University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. And, follow NCWIT on Facebook and Twitter each #TransformationTuesday for examples of inspirational progress by even more NEXT Award recipients.

Want to work towards your goals of increasing women applicants, acceptances, enrollments, and graduates in your computing department? Explore the components of an effective strategic plan by interacting with the NCWIT Postsecondary Systemic Change Model online.

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Increasing Numbers for Women of Color Starts with Gathering Data

Did you know that stats on women’s underrepresentation in the computing industry is especially concerning for women of color? As highlighted in last month’s announcement of the Reboot Representation Tech Coalition launch, 26 percent of the computing workforce in 2017 were women, and less than 10 percent were women of color:

  • 5 percent were Asian
  • 3 percent were African-American
  • 1 percent were Hispanic

“As technology’s role in society grows, so does the urgency of diversifying the tech sector,” says Melinda Gates, Co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and a passionate supporter for women in tech.

Does your company know its numbers? As outlined in Section 5 of the “NCWIT Women in IT: The Facts” report, one of the first steps in creating a company’s strategic plan should be to gather data on the current state of diverse participation. In general, this involves:

“WomenInIT”

  • collecting demographic data on relevant metrics in your company — e.g., disaggregating technical from non-technical roles; data on what kinds of technical roles (creative vs. support) women and other underrepresented employees hold
  • comparing and contrasting these data with national and international benchmarks
  • conducting a climate analysis to collect experiential data about employee perceptions of the current environment

Developing a diverse workforce needs to be treated like any other critical business concern. Ensuring data transparency and accountability is only one important part of taking a systemic change approach. Identify and address the other key factors that affect women’s participation in computing with the help of The Facts report.

The Reboot Representation Tech Coalition is housed at NCWIT and founded with the support of Pivotal Ventures, an investment and incubation company founded by Melinda Gates. All funds from the tech companies will go directly to efforts that engage underrepresented women of color.

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CS Is for Everyone, yet Many Feel Like It Is Not for Them

Did you know that while schools across the country and around the world are working to increase access to quality CS education, too many students — especially girls, Black, Latino, and Native American youth — feel like it’s not for them? As a result, the whole world misses out on the diverse perspectives needed to fuel innovation and drive change.

The newly published “Computer Science Is for Everyone” toolkit offers insights and guidance to help adult influencers ensure that all young people understand the value of a CS education, and feel welcomed and empowered to succeed. After all, “Closing the gender gap isn’t up to the students alone. It’s up to us — to change our behaviors, strategies and systems so that these classes and careers reflect the diversity in our communities,” says NCWIT Senior Research Scientist Dr. Brad McLain.

One insight in the “CS Is for Everyone” toolkit, released to coincide with the 2018 CSforALL Summit, suggests encouraging a “growth mindset” by treating questions, discovery, and even failure as positive parts of the learning process. Such effective feedback gives students information they can actually use to increase their learning and improve their performance (NCWIT Tips: 8 Ways to Give Students More Effective Feedback Using a Growth Mindset).

Want more practical recommendations? See Section 3 of the “NCWIT Girls in IT: The Facts” report for actions that teachers, school counselors, administrators/curriculum decision-makers, and others can take as change leaders for making computing more inclusive.

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NCWIT Opportunities

 

NCWIT Is Hiring

Check out all available openings, and help us spread the word: ncwit.org/jobs-ncwit.

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NCWIT Seeks Volunteers

Do you want to be inspired by the next generation of technologists? NCWIT Aspirations in Computing (AiC) needs volunteer application reviewers like you for three separate AiC awards this 2018-19 season. Most of our applications do not require a technical background to review, and it’s a great way to support NCWIT and the community of women in tech in your local region! // http://www.aspirations.org/VolunteerReviewer

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“AiCHS”Calling All 9th-12th Grade Women in Tech

Applications for the 2019 NCWIT Award Aspirations in Computing for 9th-12th grade women close on November 5, 2018! Get detailed information about all of the various prizes, and help us spread the word about this one-of-a-kind recognition of women’s technical aspirations and contributions. // https://www.aspirations.org/AiCAwards_Share

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